Storm Reference - Storm Commands

Storm commands are built-in or custom commands that can be used natively within Synapse Storm queries.

Built-in commands are native to the Storm library and loaded by default within a given Cortex. Built-in commands comprise a set of helper commands that perform a variety of specialized tasks that are useful regardless of the types of data stored in Synapse or the types of analysis performed.

Custom commands are Storm commands that have been added to a Cortex to invoke the execution of dynamically loaded modules. Synapse Power-Ups (Power-Up) are examples of modules that may install additional Storm commands to implement functionality specific to that Power-Up (such as querying a third-party data source to automatically ingest and model the data in Synapse).

Storm Commands and the Pipe Character

The pipe character ( | ) is used with Storm commands to:

  • Return to Storm query syntax after running a Storm command.

  • Separate individual Storm commands and their parameters (i.e., if you are “chaining” multiple commands together).

For example:

inet:fqdn=woot.com nettools.whois | nettools.dns --type A AAAA NS | -> inet:dns:a

The query above:

  • lifts the FQDN woot.com,

  • performs a live “whois” lookup using the Synapse-Nettools Power-Up,

  • performs a live DNS query for the FQDN’s A, AAAA, and NS records, and

  • pivots from the FQDN to any associated DNS A records.

The pipe is used:

  • to separate the two nettools.* commands, and

  • to separate the nettools.dns command and its switches from the subsequent query operation (the pivot).

Tip

A pipe character is not required between a Storm operation and any initial Storm command (e.g., between the inet:fqdn=woot.com lift operation and the subsequent nettools.whois command in the example above). A pipe character can optionally be placed in this location (some users may find it easier to remember the “rules” for pipe use as “place a pipe between Storm operations and Storm commands”), but is not necessary.

Storm Command Reference

The full list of Storm commands (built-in and custom) available in a given instance of Synapse can be displayed with the help command.

Help for a specific Storm command can be displayed with <command> --help.

Tip

This section details the usage and syntax for built-in Storm commands. Many of the commands below - such as count, intersect, limit, max / min, uniq, or the various gen (generate) commands - directly support analysis tasks.

Other commands, such as those used to manage daemons, queues, packages, or services, are likely of greater interest to Synapse administrators or developers.

See Storm Reference - Document Syntax Conventions for an explanation of the syntax format used below.

The Storm query language is covered in detail starting with the Storm Reference - Introduction section of the Synapse User Guide.

Tip

Storm commands, including custom commands, are added to Synapse as runtime nodes (“runt nodes” - see Node, Runt) of the form syn:cmd. With a few restrictions, these runt nodes can be lifted, filtered, and operated on similar to the way you work with other nodes.

Example

Lift the syn:cmd node for the Storm movetag command:

storm> syn:cmd=movetag
syn:cmd=movetag
        :doc = Rename an entire tag tree and preserve time intervals.

help

The help command displays the list of available commands within the current instance of Synapse and a brief message describing each command. Help for individual commands is available via <command> --help. The help command can also be used to inspect information about Storm Libraries and Storm Types.

Syntax:

storm> help --help


    List available information about Storm and brief descriptions of different items.

    Notes:

        If an item is provided, this can be a string or a function.

    Examples:

        // Get all available commands, libraries, types, and their brief descriptions.

        help

        // Only get commands which have "model" in the name.

        help model

        // Get help about the base Storm library

        help $lib

        // Get detailed help about a specific library or library function

        help --verbose $lib.print

        // Get detailed help about a named Storm type

        help --verbose str

        // Get help about a method from a $node object

        <inbound $node> help $node.tags



Usage: help [options] <item>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  -v                          : Display detailed help when available.

Arguments:

  [item]                      : List information about a subset of commands or a specific item.

aha

Storm includes aha.* commands that allow you to work with Synapse’s AHA service, specifically with AHA service pools.

Help for individual auth.* commands can be displayed using:

<command> --help

aha.pool.add

The storm.aha.pool.add command creates a new AHA service pool.

Syntax:

storm> aha.pool.add --help

Create an AHA service pool configuration.

Usage: aha.pool.add [options] <name>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The name of the new AHA service pool.

aha.pool.del

The storm.aha.pool.del command deletes an AHA service pool configuration.

Syntax:

storm> aha.pool.del --help

Delete an AHA service pool configuration.

Usage: aha.pool.del [options] <name>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The name of the AHA pool to delete.

aha.pool.list

The storm.aha.pool.list command lists AHA service pools and their associated services.

Syntax:

storm> aha.pool.list --help

Display a list of AHA service pools and their services.

Usage: aha.pool.list [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

aha.pool.svc.add

The storm.aha.pool.svc.add command adds a service to an existing AHA service pool.

Syntax:

storm> aha.pool.svc.add --help


            Add an AHA service to a service pool.

            Examples:

                // add 00.cortex... to the existing pool named pool.cortex
                aha.pool.svc.add pool.cortex... 00.cortex...


Usage: aha.pool.svc.add [options] <poolname> <svcname>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <poolname>                  : The name of the AHA pool.
  <svcname>                   : The name of the AHA service.

aha.pool.svc.del

The storm.aha.pool.svc.del command removes a service from an existing AHA service pool.

Syntax:

storm> aha.pool.svc.del --help

Remove an AHA service from a service pool.

Usage: aha.pool.svc.del [options] <poolname> <svcname>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <poolname>                  : The name of the AHA pool.
  <svcname>                   : The name of the AHA service.

auth

Storm includes auth.* commands that allow you create and manage users and roles, and manage their associated permissions (rules).

Help for individual auth.* commands can be displayed using:

<command> --help

auth.gate.show

The auth.gate.show command displays the user, roles, and permissions associated with the specified Auth Gate.

Syntax

storm> auth.gate.show --help



            Display users, roles, and permissions for an auth gate.

            Examples:
                // Display the users and roles with permissions to the top layer of the current view.
                auth.gate.show $lib.layer.get().iden

                // Display the users and roles with permissions to the current view.
                auth.gate.show $lib.view.get().iden


Usage: auth.gate.show [options] <gateiden>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <gateiden>                  : The GUID of the auth gate.

auth.perms.list

The auth.perms.list command displays the set of permissions currently defined within the Cortex. This includes native Synapse permissions as well as any permissions associated with other packages and services, including Power-Ups. Each permission includes a brief description of the permission, the associated auth gate (e.g., ‘cortex’, ‘layer’) and the default state (true/allowed or false/denied).

Syntax:

storm> auth.perms.list --help

Display a list of the current permissions defined within the Cortex.

Usage: auth.perms.list [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

auth.role.add

The auth.role.add command creates a role.

Syntax:

storm> auth.role.add --help


            Add a role.

            Examples:

                // Add a role named "ninjas"
                auth.role.add ninjas


Usage: auth.role.add [options] <name>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The name of the role.

auth.role.addrule

The auth.role.addrule command adds a rule (permission) to a role.

Syntax:

storm> auth.role.addrule --help


            Add a rule to a role.

            Examples:

                // add an allow rule to the role "ninjas" for permission "foo.bar.baz"
                auth.role.addrule ninjas foo.bar.baz

                // add a deny rule to the role "ninjas" for permission "foo.bar.baz"
                auth.role.addrule ninjas "!foo.bar.baz"

                // add an allow rule to the role "ninjas" for permission "baz" at the first index.
                auth.role.addrule ninjas baz --index 0


Usage: auth.role.addrule [options] <name> <rule>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --gate <gate>               : The auth gate id to add the rule to. (default: None)
  --index <index>             : Specify the rule location as a 0 based index. (default: None)

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The name of the role.
  <rule>                      : The rule string.

auth.role.del

The auth.role.del command deletes a role.

Syntax:

storm> auth.role.del --help


            Delete a role.

            Examples:

                // Delete a role named "ninjas"
                auth.role.del ninjas


Usage: auth.role.del [options] <name>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The name of the role.

auth.role.delrule

The auth.role.delrule command removes a rule (permission) from a role.

Syntax:

storm> auth.role.delrule --help


            Remove a rule from a role.

            Examples:

                // Delete the allow rule from the role "ninjas" for permission "foo.bar.baz"
                auth.role.delrule ninjas foo.bar.baz

                // Delete the deny rule from the role "ninjas" for permission "foo.bar.baz"
                auth.role.delrule ninjas "!foo.bar.baz"

                // Delete the rule at index 5 from the role "ninjas"
                auth.role.delrule ninjas --index  5


Usage: auth.role.delrule [options] <name> <rule>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --gate <gate>               : The auth gate id to remove the rule from. (default: None)
  --index                     : Specify the rule as a 0 based index into the list of rules.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The name of the role.
  <rule>                      : The rule string.

auth.role.list

The auth.role.list lists all roles in the Cortex.

Syntax:

storm> auth.role.list --help


            List all roles.

            Examples:

                // Display the list of all roles
                auth.role.list


Usage: auth.role.list [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

auth.role.mod

The auth.role.mod modifies an existing role.

Syntax:

storm> auth.role.mod --help


            Modify properties of a role.

            Examples:

                // Rename the "ninjas" role to "admins"
                auth.role.mod ninjas --name admins


Usage: auth.role.mod [options] <rolename>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --name <name>               : The new name for the role.

Arguments:

  <rolename>                  : The name of the role.

auth.role.show

The auth.role.show displays the details for a given role.

Syntax:

storm> auth.role.show --help



            Display details for a given role by name.

            Examples:

                // Display details about the role "ninjas"
                auth.role.show ninjas


Usage: auth.role.show [options] <rolename>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <rolename>                  : The name of the role.

auth.user.add

The auth.user.add command creates a user.

Syntax:

storm> auth.user.add --help


            Add a user.

            Examples:

                // Add a user named "visi" with the email address "[email protected]"
                auth.user.add visi --email [email protected]


Usage: auth.user.add [options] <name>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --email <email>             : The user's email address. (default: None)

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The name of the user.

auth.user.addrule

The auth.user.addrule command adds a rule (permission) to a user.

Syntax:

storm> auth.user.addrule --help


            Add a rule to a user.

            Examples:

                // add an allow rule to the user "visi" for permission "foo.bar.baz"
                auth.user.addrule visi foo.bar.baz

                // add a deny rule to the user "visi" for permission "foo.bar.baz"
                auth.user.addrule visi "!foo.bar.baz"

                // add an allow rule to the user "visi" for permission "baz" at the first index.
                auth.user.addrule visi baz --index 0


Usage: auth.user.addrule [options] <name> <rule>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --gate <gate>               : The auth gate id to grant permission on. (default: None)
  --index <index>             : Specify the rule location as a 0 based index. (default: None)

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The name of the user.
  <rule>                      : The rule string.

auth.user.allowed

The auth.user.allowed command checks whether a user has a permission for the specified scope (view or layer; if no scope is specified with the --gate option, the permission is checked globally).

The command retuns whether the permission is allowed (true) the source of the permission (e.g., if the permission is due to having a particular role).

Syntax:

storm> auth.user.allowed --help


            Show whether the user is allowed the given permission and why.

            Examples:

                auth.user.allowed visi foo.bar


Usage: auth.user.allowed [options] <username> <permname>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --gate <gate>               : An auth gate to test the perms against.

Arguments:

  <username>                  : The name of the user.
  <permname>                  : The permission string.

auth.user.delrule

The auth.user.delrule command removes a rule (permission) from a user.

Syntax:

storm> auth.user.delrule --help


            Remove a rule from a user.

            Examples:

                // Delete the allow rule from the user "visi" for permission "foo.bar.baz"
                auth.user.delrule visi foo.bar.baz

                // Delete the deny rule from the user "visi" for permission "foo.bar.baz"
                auth.user.delrule visi "!foo.bar.baz"

                // Delete the rule at index 5 from the user "visi"
                auth.user.delrule visi --index  5


Usage: auth.user.delrule [options] <name> <rule>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --gate <gate>               : The auth gate id to grant permission on. (default: None)
  --index                     : Specify the rule as a 0 based index into the list of rules.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The name of the user.
  <rule>                      : The rule string.

auth.user.grant

The auth.user.grant command grants a role (and its associated permissions) to a user.

Syntax:

storm> auth.user.grant --help


            Grant a role to a user.

            Examples:

                // Grant the role "ninjas" to the user "visi"
                auth.user.grant visi ninjas

                // Grant the role "ninjas" to the user "visi" at the first index.
                auth.user.grant visi ninjas --index 0



Usage: auth.user.grant [options] <username> <rolename>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --index <index>             : Specify the role location as a 0 based index. (default: None)

Arguments:

  <username>                  : The name of the user.
  <rolename>                  : The name of the role.

auth.user.list

The auth.user.list command displays all users in the Cortex.

Syntax:

storm> auth.user.list --help


            List all users.

            Examples:

                // Display the list of all users
                auth.user.list


Usage: auth.user.list [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

auth.user.mod

The auth.user.mod command modifies a user account.

Syntax:

storm> auth.user.mod --help


            Modify properties of a user.

            Examples:

                // Rename the user "foo" to "bar"
                auth.user.mod foo --name bar

                // Make the user "visi" an admin
                auth.user.mod visi --admin $lib.true

                // Unlock the user "visi" and set their email to "[email protected]"
                auth.user.mod visi --locked $lib.false --email [email protected]

                // Grant admin access to user visi for the current view
                auth.user.mod visi --admin $lib.true --gate $lib.view.get().iden

                // Revoke admin access to user visi for the current view
                auth.user.mod visi --admin $lib.false --gate $lib.view.get().iden


Usage: auth.user.mod [options] <username>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --name <name>               : The new name for the user.
  --email <email>             : The email address to set for the user.
  --passwd <passwd>           : The new password for the user. This is best passed into the runtime as a variable.
  --admin <admin>             : True to make the user and admin, false to remove their remove their admin status.
  --gate <gate>               : The auth gate iden to grant or revoke admin status on. Use in conjunction with `--admin <bool>`.
  --locked <locked>           : True to lock the user, false to unlock them.

Arguments:

  <username>                  : The name of the user.

auth.user.revoke

The auth.user.revoke command revokes a role (and its associated permissions) from a user.

Syntax:

storm> auth.user.revoke --help


            Revoke a role from a user.

            Examples:

                // Revoke the role "ninjas" from the user "visi"
                auth.user.revoke visi ninjas



Usage: auth.user.revoke [options] <username> <rolename>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <username>                  : The name of the user.
  <rolename>                  : The name of the role.

auth.user.show

The auth.user.show command displays information for a specific user.

Syntax:

storm> auth.user.show --help


            Display details for a given user by name.

            Examples:

                // Display details about the user "visi"
                auth.user.show visi


Usage: auth.user.show [options] <username>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <username>                  : The name of the user.

background

The background command allows you to execute a Storm query as a background task (e.g., to free up the CLI / Storm runtime for additional queries).

Note

Use of background is a “fire-and-forget” process - any status messages (warnings or errors) are not returned to the console, and if the query is interrupted for any reason, it will not resume.

See also parallel.

Syntax:

storm> background --help


    Execute a query pipeline as a background task.
    NOTE: Variables are passed through but nodes are not


Usage: background [options] <query>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <query>                     : The query to execute in the background.

batch

The batch command allows you to run a Storm query with batched sets of nodes.

Note that in most cases, Storm queries are meant to operate in a “streaming” manner on individual nodes. This command is intended to be used in cases such as querying external APIs that support aggregate queries (i.e., an API that allows you to query 100 objects in a single API call as part of the API’s quota system).

Syntax:

storm> batch --help


    Run a query with batched sets of nodes.

    The batched query will have the set of inbound nodes available in the
    variable $nodes.

    This command also takes a conditional as an argument. If the conditional
    evaluates to true, the nodes returned by the batched query will be yielded,
    if it evaluates to false, the inbound nodes will be yielded after executing the
    batched query.

    NOTE: This command is intended to facilitate use cases such as queries to external
          APIs with aggregate node values to reduce quota consumption. As this command
          interrupts the node stream, it should be used carefully to avoid unintended
          slowdowns in the pipeline.

    Example:

        // Execute a query with batches of 5 nodes, then yield the inbound nodes
        batch $lib.false --size 5 { $lib.print($nodes) }


Usage: batch [options] <cond> <query>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --size <size>               : The number of nodes to collect before running the batched query (max 10000). (default: 10)

Arguments:

  <cond>                      : The conditional value for the yield option.
  <query>                     : The query to execute with batched nodes.

copyto

The copyto command allows you to copy nodes from the current view to a specified target view. Nodes are copied to the write layer (the topmost layer) in the target view.

When copying nodes, the history of the node (i.e., changes to the node, timestamps, associated user) in the source view (the view layer(s)) is preserved; the changes written to the target view’s write layer are owned by the user executing the copyto command.

See the movenodes command to move nodes between layers in the same layer stack.

Note

The copyto command, like the movenodes command, is meant to be used by Synapse administrators in specific use cases.

Syntax:

storm> copyto --help


    Copy nodes from the current view into another view.

    Examples:

        // Copy all nodes tagged with #cno.mal.redtree to the target view.

        #cno.mal.redtree | copyto 33c971ac77943da91392dadd0eec0571


Usage: copyto [options] <view>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --no-data                   : Do not copy node data to the destination view.

Arguments:

  <view>                      : The destination view ID to copy the nodes to.

cortex.httpapi

Note

See the Extended HTTP API guide for additional background on Extended HTTP API endpoints.

Storm includes cortex.httpapi.* commands that allow a user to list and manage Extended HTTP API endpoints.

Help for individual cortex.httpapi.* commands can be displayed using:

<command> --help

cortex.httpapi.index

The cortex.httpapi.index command is used to change the resolution order of the Extended HTTP API endpoints.

Syntax:

storm> cortex.httpapi.index --help

Set the index of an Extended HTTP API endpoint.

Examples:

    // Move an endpoint to the first index.
    cortex.httpapi.index 60e5ba38e90958fd8e2ddd9e4730f16b 0

    // Move an endpoint to the third index.
    cortex.httpapi.index dd9e4730f16b60e5ba58fd8e2d38e909 2


Usage: cortex.httpapi.index [options] <iden> <index>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <iden>                      : The iden of the endpoint to move. This will also match iden prefixes or name prefixes.
  <index>                     : Specify the endpoint location as a 0 based index.

cortex.httpapi.list

The cortex.httpapi.list command is used to list the Extended HTTP API endpoints.

Syntax:

storm> cortex.httpapi.list --help

List Extended HTTP API endpoints

Usage: cortex.httpapi.list [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

cortex.httpapi.stat

The cortex.httpapi.stat command is used to show the detailed information for a single Extended HTTP API Endpoint.

Syntax:

storm> cortex.httpapi.stat --help

Get details for an Extended HTTP API endpoint.

Usage: cortex.httpapi.stat [options] <iden>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <iden>                      : The iden of the endpoint to inspect. This will also match iden prefixes or name prefixes.

count

The count command enumerates the number of nodes returned from a given Storm query and displays the final tally. The associated nodes can optionally be displayed with the --yield switch.

Syntax:

storm> count --help


    Iterate through query results, and print the resulting number of nodes
    which were lifted. This does not yield the nodes counted, unless the
    --yield switch is provided.

    Example:

        # Count the number of IPV4 nodes with a given ASN.
        inet:ipv4:asn=20 | count

        # Count the number of IPV4 nodes with a given ASN and yield them.
        inet:ipv4:asn=20 | count --yield



Usage: count [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --yield                     : Yield inbound nodes.

Examples:

  • Count the number of IP address nodes that Trend Micro reports are associated with the threat group Earth Preta:

storm> inet:ipv4#rep.trend.earthpreta | count
Counted 5 nodes.
  • Count nodes from a lift and yield the output:

storm> inet:ipv4#rep.trend.earthpreta | count --yield
inet:ipv4=66.129.222.1
        :type = unicast
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:20.001
        #rep.trend.earthpreta
inet:ipv4=184.82.164.104
        :type = unicast
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:20.009
        #rep.trend.earthpreta
inet:ipv4=209.161.249.125
        :type = unicast
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:20.015
        #rep.trend.earthpreta
inet:ipv4=69.90.65.240
        :type = unicast
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:20.021
        #rep.trend.earthpreta
inet:ipv4=70.62.232.98
        :type = unicast
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:20.027
        #rep.trend.earthpreta
Counted 5 nodes.
  • Count the number of DNS A records for the domain woot.com where the lift produces no results:

storm> inet:dns:a:fqdn=woot.com | count
Counted 0 nodes.

cron

Note

See the Storm Reference - Automation guide for additional background on cron jobs (as well as triggers and macros), including examples.

Storm includes cron.* commands that allow you to create and manage scheduled Cron jobs. Within Synapse, jobs are Storm queries that execute on a recurring or one-time (cron.at) basis.

Help for individual cron.* commands can be displayed using:

<command> --help

Tip

Cron jobs (including jobs created with cron.at) are added to Synapse as runtime nodes (“runt nodes” - see Node, Runt) of the form syn:cron. With a few restrictions, these runt nodes can be lifted, filtered, and operated on similar to the way you work with other nodes.

cron.add

The cron.add command creates an individual cron job within a Cortex.

Syntax:

storm> cron.add --help


Add a recurring cron job to a cortex.

Notes:
    All times are interpreted as UTC.

    All arguments are interpreted as the job period, unless the value ends in
    an equals sign, in which case the argument is interpreted as the recurrence
    period.  Only one recurrence period parameter may be specified.

    Currently, a fixed unit must not be larger than a specified recurrence
    period.  i.e. '--hour 7 --minute +15' (every 15 minutes from 7-8am?) is not
    supported.

    Value values for fixed hours are 0-23 on a 24-hour clock where midnight is 0.

    If the --day parameter value does not start with a '+' and is an integer, it is
    interpreted as a fixed day of the month.  A negative integer may be
    specified to count from the end of the month with -1 meaning the last day
    of the month.  All fixed day values are clamped to valid days, so for
    example '-d 31' will run on February 28.
    If the fixed day parameter is a value in ([Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri, Sat,
    Sun] if locale is set to English) it is interpreted as a fixed day of the
    week.

    Otherwise, if the parameter value starts with a '+', then it is interpreted
    as a recurrence interval of that many days.

    If no plus-sign-starting parameter is specified, the recurrence period
    defaults to the unit larger than all the fixed parameters.   e.g. '--minute 5'
    means every hour at 5 minutes past, and --hour 3, --minute 1 means 3:01 every day.

    At least one optional parameter must be provided.

    All parameters accept multiple comma-separated values.  If multiple
    parameters have multiple values, all combinations of those values are used.

    All fixed units not specified lower than the recurrence period default to
    the lowest valid value, e.g. --month +2 will be scheduled at 12:00am the first of
    every other month.  One exception is if the largest fixed value is day of the
    week, then the default period is set to be a week.

    A month period with a day of week fixed value is not currently supported.

    Fixed-value year (i.e. --year 2019) is not supported.  See the 'at'
    command for one-time cron jobs.

    As an alternative to the above options, one may use exactly one of
    --hourly, --daily, --monthly, --yearly with a colon-separated list of
    fixed parameters for the value.  It is an error to use both the individual
    options and these aliases at the same time.

Examples:
    Run a query every last day of the month at 3 am
    cron.add --hour 3 --day -1 {#foo}

    Run a query every 8 hours
    cron.add --hour +8 {#foo}

    Run a query every Wednesday and Sunday at midnight and noon
    cron.add --hour 0,12 --day Wed,Sun {#foo}

    Run a query every other day at 3:57pm
    cron.add --day +2 --minute 57 --hour 15 {#foo}


Usage: cron.add [options] <query>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --minute <minute>           : Minute value for job or recurrence period.
  --name <name>               : An optional name for the cron job.
  --doc <doc>                 : An optional doc string for the cron job.
  --hour <hour>               : Hour value for job or recurrence period.
  --day <day>                 : Day value for job or recurrence period.
  --month <month>             : Month value for job or recurrence period.
  --year <year>               : Year value for recurrence period.
  --hourly <hourly>           : Fixed parameters for an hourly job.
  --daily <daily>             : Fixed parameters for a daily job.
  --monthly <monthly>         : Fixed parameters for a monthly job.
  --yearly <yearly>           : Fixed parameters for a yearly job.
  --iden <iden>               : Fixed iden to assign to the cron job
  --view <view>               : View to run the cron job against

Arguments:

  <query>                     : Query for the cron job to execute.

cron.at

The cron.at command creates a non-recurring (one-time) cron job within a Cortex. Just like standard (recurring) cron jobs, jobs created with cron.at will persist (remain in the list of cron jobs and as syn:cron runt nodes) until they are explicitly removed using cron.del.

Syntax:

storm> cron.at --help


Adds a non-recurring cron job.

Notes:
    This command accepts one or more time specifications followed by exactly
    one storm query in curly braces.  Each time specification may be in synapse
    time delta format (e.g --day +1) or synapse time format (e.g.
    20501217030432101).  Seconds will be ignored, as cron jobs' granularity is
    limited to minutes.

    All times are interpreted as UTC.

    The other option for time specification is a relative time from now.  This
    consists of a plus sign, a positive integer, then one of 'minutes, hours,
    days'.

    Note that the record for a cron job is stored until explicitly deleted via
    "cron.del".

Examples:
    # Run a storm query in 5 minutes
    cron.at --minute +5 {[inet:ipv4=1]}

    # Run a storm query tomorrow and in a week
    cron.at --day +1,+7 {[inet:ipv4=1]}

    # Run a query at the end of the year Zulu
    cron.at --dt 20181231Z2359 {[inet:ipv4=1]}


Usage: cron.at [options] <query>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --minute <minute>           : Minute(s) to execute at.
  --hour <hour>               : Hour(s) to execute at.
  --day <day>                 : Day(s) to execute at.
  --dt <dt>                   : Datetime(s) to execute at.
  --now                       : Execute immediately.
  --iden <iden>               : A set iden to assign to the new cron job
  --view <view>               : View to run the cron job against

Arguments:

  <query>                     : Query for the cron job to execute.

cron.cleanup

The cron.cleanup command can be used to remove any one-time cron jobs (“at” jobs) that have completed.

Syntax:

storm> cron.cleanup --help

Delete all completed at jobs

Usage: cron.cleanup [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

cron.list

The cron.list command displays the set of cron jobs in the Cortex that the current user can view / modify based on their permissions.

Cron jobs are displayed in alphanumeric order by job Iden. Jobs are sorted upon Cortex initialization, so newly-created jobs will be displayed at the bottom of the list until the list is re-sorted the next time the Cortex is restarted.

Syntax:

storm> cron.list --help

List existing cron jobs in the cortex.

Usage: cron.list [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

cron.stat

The cron.stat command displays statistics for an individual cron job and provides more detail on an individual job vs. cron.list, including any errors and the interval at which the job executes. To view the stats for a job, you must provide the first portion of the job’s iden (i.e., enough of the iden that the job can be uniquely identified), which can be obtained using cron.list or by lifting the appropriate syn:cron node.

Syntax:

storm> cron.stat --help

Gives detailed information about a cron job.

Usage: cron.stat [options] <iden>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <iden>                      : Any prefix that matches exactly one valid cron job iden is accepted.

cron.mod

The cron.mod command modifies the Storm query associated with a specific cron job. To modify a job, you must provide the first portion of the job’s iden (i.e., enough of the iden that the job can be uniquely identified), which can be obtained using cron.list or by lifting the appropriate syn:cron node.

Note

Other aspects of the cron job, such as its schedule for execution, cannot be modified once the job has been created. To change these aspects you must delete and re-add the job.

Syntax:

storm> cron.mod --help

Modify an existing cron job's query.

Usage: cron.mod [options] <iden> <query>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <iden>                      : Any prefix that matches exactly one valid cron job iden is accepted.
  <query>                     : New storm query for the cron job.

cron.move

The cron.move command moves a cron job from one View to another.

Syntax:

storm> cron.move --help

Move a cron job from one view to another

Usage: cron.move [options] <iden> <view>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <iden>                      : Any prefix that matches exactly one valid cron job iden is accepted.
  <view>                      : View to move the cron job to.

cron.disable

The cron.disable command disables a job and prevents it from executing without removing it from the Cortex. To disable a job, you must provide the first portion of the job’s iden (i.e., enough of the iden that the job can be uniquely identified), which can be obtained using cron.list or by lifting the appropriate syn:cron node.

Syntax:

storm> cron.disable --help

Disable a cron job in the cortex.

Usage: cron.disable [options] <iden>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <iden>                      : Any prefix that matches exactly one valid cron job iden is accepted.

cron.enable

The cron.enable command enables a disabled cron job. To enable a job, you must provide the first portion of the job’s iden (i.e., enough of the iden that the job can be uniquely identified), which can be obtained using cron.list or by lifting the appropriate syn:cron node.

Note

Cron jobs, including non-recurring jobs added with cron.at, are enabled by default upon creation.

Syntax:

storm> cron.enable --help

Enable a cron job in the cortex.

Usage: cron.enable [options] <iden>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <iden>                      : Any prefix that matches exactly one valid cron job iden is accepted.

cron.del

The cron.del command permanently removes a cron job from the Cortex. To delete a job, you must provide the first portion of the job’s iden (i.e., enough of the iden that the job can be uniquely identified), which can be obtained using cron.list or by lifting the appropriate syn:cron node.

Syntax:

storm> cron.del --help

Delete a cron job from the cortex.

Usage: cron.del [options] <iden>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <iden>                      : Any prefix that matches exactly one valid cron job iden is accepted.

delnode

The delnode command deletes a node or set of nodes from a Cortex.

Warning

The Storm delnode command includes some limited checks (see below) to try and prevent the accidental deletion of nodes that are still connected to other nodes in the knowledge graph. However, these checks are not foolproof, and delnode has the potential to be destructive if executed on an incorrect, badly formed, or mistyped query.

Users are strongly encouraged to validate their query by first executing it on its own to confirm it returns the expected nodes before piping the query to the delnode command.

In addition, use of the --force switch with delnode will override all safety checks and forcibly delete ALL nodes input to the command.

This parameter should be used with extreme caution as it may result in broken references (e.g., “holes” in the graph) within Synapse.

Syntax:

storm> delnode --help


    Delete nodes produced by the previous query logic.

    (no nodes are returned)

    Example

        inet:fqdn=vertex.link | delnode


Usage: delnode [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --force                     : Force delete even if it causes broken references (requires admin).
  --delbytes                  : For file:bytes nodes, remove the bytes associated with the sha256 property from the axon as well if present.
  --deledges                  : Delete N2 light edges before deleting the node.

Examples:

  • Delete the node for the domain woowoo.com:

storm> inet:fqdn=woowoo.com | delnode
  • Forcibly delete all nodes with the #testing tag:

storm> #testing | delnode --force

Usage Notes:

  • delnode operates on the output of a previous Storm query.

  • delnode performs some basic sanity-checking to help prevent egregious mistakes, and will generate an error in cases such as:

    • attempting to delete a node (such as inet:fqdn=woot.com) that is still referenced by (i.e., is a secondary property of) another node (such as inet:dns:a=(woot.com, 1.1.1.1).

    • attmpting to delete a syn:tag node where that tag still exists on other nodes.

    However, it is important to keep in mind that delnode cannot prevent all mistakes.

diff

The diff command generates a list of nodes with changes (i.e., newly created or modified nodes) present in the top Layer of the current View. The diff command may be useful before performing a merge operation.

Syntax:

storm> diff --help


    Generate a list of nodes with changes in the top layer of the current view.

    Examples:

        // Lift all nodes with any changes

        diff

        // Lift ou:org nodes that were added in the top layer.

        diff --prop ou:org

        // Lift inet:ipv4 nodes with the :asn property modified in the top layer.

        diff --prop inet:ipv4:asn

        // Lift the nodes with the tag #cno.mal.redtree added in the top layer.

        diff --tag cno.mal.redtree


Usage: diff [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --tag <tag>                 : Lift only nodes with the given tag in the top layer. (default: None)
  --prop <prop>               : Lift nodes with changes to the given property the top layer. (default: None)

divert

The divert command allows Storm to either consume a generator or yield its results based on a conditional.

Syntax:

storm> divert --help


    Either consume a generator or yield it's results based on a conditional.

    NOTE: This command is purpose built to facilitate the --yield convention
          common to storm commands.

    NOTE: The genr argument must not be a function that returns, else it will
          be invoked for each inbound node.

    Example:
        divert $cmdopts.yield $fooBarBaz()


Usage: divert [options] <cond> <genr>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --size <size>               : The max number of times to iterate the generator. (default: None)

Arguments:

  <cond>                      : The conditional value for the yield option.
  <genr>                      : The generator function value that yields nodes.

dmon

Storm includes dmon.* commands that allow you to work with daemons (see Daemon).

Help for individual dmon.* commands can be displayed using:

<command> --help

dmon.list

The dmon.list command displays the set of running dmon queries in the Cortex.

Syntax:

storm> dmon.list --help

List the storm daemon queries running in the cortex.

Usage: dmon.list [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

edges

Storm includes edges.* commands that allow you to work with lightweight (light) edges. Also see the lift.byverb and model.edge.* commands under lift and model below.

Help for individual edge.* commands can be displayed using:

<command> --help

edges.del

The edges.del command is designed to delete multiple light edges to (or from) a set of nodes (contrast with using Storm edit syntax - see Delete Light Edges).

Syntax:

storm> edges.del --help


    Bulk delete light edges from input nodes.

    Examples:

        # Delete all "foo" light edges from an inet:ipv4
        inet:ipv4=1.2.3.4 | edges.del foo

        # Delete light edges with any verb from a node
        inet:ipv4=1.2.3.4 | edges.del *

        # Delete all "foo" light edges to an inet:ipv4
        inet:ipv4=1.2.3.4 | edges.del foo --n2


Usage: edges.del [options] <verb>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --n2                        : Delete light edges where input node is N2 instead of N1.

Arguments:

  <verb>                      : The verb of light edges to delete.

feed

Storm includes feed.* commands that allow you to work with feeds (see Feed).

Help for individual feed.* commands can be displayed using:

<command> --help

feed.list

The feed.list command displays available feed functions in the Cortex.

Syntax:

storm> feed.list --help

List the feed functions available in the Cortex

Usage: feed.list [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

gen

Storm includes various gen.* (“generate”) commands that allow you to easily query for common guid-based nodes (see Form, GUID) based on one or more “human friendly” secondary properties, and create (generate) the specified node if it does not already exist.

Because guid nodes have a primary property that may be arbitrary, gen.* commands simplify the process of deconflicting on secondary properties before creating certain guid nodes.

Note

See the guid section of the Storm Reference - Type-Specific Storm Behavior for a detailed discussion of guids, guid behavior, and deconfliction considerations for guid forms.

Nodes created using generate commands will have a limited subset of properties set (e.g., an organization node deconflicted and created based on a name will only have its ou:org:name property set). Users can set additional property values as they see fit.

Help for individual gen.* commands can be displayed using:

<command> --help

Note

New gen.* commands are added to Synapse on an ongoing basis as we identify new cases where such commands are helpful. Use the help command for the current list of gen.* commands available in your instance of Synapse.

gen.it.prod.soft

The gen.it.prod.soft command locates (lifts) or creates an it:prod:soft node based on the software name (it:prod:soft:name and / or it:prod:soft:names).

Syntax:

storm> gen.it.prod.soft --help

Lift (or create) an it:prod:soft node based on the software name.

Usage: gen.it.prod.soft [options] <name>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The name of the software.

gen.lang.language

The gen.lang.language command locates (lifts) or creates a lang:language node based on the language name (lang:language:name and / or lang:language:names).

Syntax:

storm> gen.lang.language --help

Lift (or create) a lang:language node based on the name.

Usage: gen.lang.language [options] <name>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The name of the language.

gen.ou.campaign

The gen.ou.campaign command locates (lifts) or creates an ou:campaign node based on the campaign name (ou:campaign:name and / or ou:campaign:names) and the name of the reporting organization (ou:campaign:reporter:name).

Syntax:

storm> gen.ou.campaign --help

Lift or create an ou:campaign based on the name and reporting organization.

Usage: gen.ou.campaign [options] <name> <reporter>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The name of the campaign.
  <reporter>                  : The name of the reporting organization.

gen.ou.id.number

The gen.ou.id.number command locates (lifts) or creates an ou:id:number node based on the organization ID type (ou:id:type) and organization ID value (ou:id:value).

Syntax:

storm> gen.ou.id.number --help

Lift (or create) an ou:id:number node based on the organization ID type and value.

Usage: gen.ou.id.number [options] <type> <value>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <type>                      : The type of the organization ID.
  <value>                     : The value of the organization ID.

gen.ou.id.type

The gen.ou.id.type command locates (lifts) or creates an ou:id:type node based on the friendly name of the organization ID type (ou:id:type:name).

Syntax:

storm> gen.ou.id.type --help

Lift (or create) an ou:id:type node based on the name of the type.

Usage: gen.ou.id.type [options] <name>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The friendly name of the organization ID type.

gen.ou.industry

The gen.ou.industry commands locates (lifts) or creates an ou:industry node based on the industry name (ou:industry:name and / or ou:industry:names).

Syntax:

storm> gen.ou.industry --help


            Lift (or create) an ou:industry node based on the industry name.


Usage: gen.ou.industry [options] <name>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The industry name.

gen.ou.org

The gen.ou.org command locates (lifts) or creates an ou:org node based on the organization name (ou:org:name and / or ou:org:names).

Syntax:

storm> gen.ou.org --help

Lift (or create) an ou:org node based on the organization name.

Usage: gen.ou.org [options] <name>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The name of the organization.

gen.ou.org.hq

The gen.ou.org.hq command locates (lifts) the primary ps:contact node for an organization (i.e., the contact set for the ou:org:hq property) or creates the contact node (and sets the ou:org:hq property) if it does not exist, based on the organization name (ou:org:name and / or ou:org:names).

Syntax:

storm> gen.ou.org.hq --help

Lift (or create) the primary ps:contact node for the ou:org based on the organization name.

Usage: gen.ou.org.hq [options] <name>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The name of the organization.

gen.pol.country

The gen.pol.country command locates (lifts) or creates a pol:country node based on the two-letter ISO-3166 country code (pol:country:iso2) .

Syntax:

storm> gen.pol.country --help


            Lift (or create) a pol:country node based on the 2 letter ISO-3166 country code.

            Examples:

                // Yield the pol:country node which represents the country of Ukraine.
                gen.pol.country ua


Usage: gen.pol.country [options] <iso2>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --try                       : Type normalization will fail silently instead of raising an exception.

Arguments:

  <iso2>                      : The 2 letter ISO-3166 country code.

gen.pol.country.government

The gen.pol.country.government command locates (lifts) the ou:org node representing a country’s government (i.e., the organization set for the pol:country:government property) or creates the node (and sets the pol:country:government property) if it does not exist, based on the two-letter ISO-3166 country code (pol:country:iso2).

Syntax:

storm> gen.pol.country.government --help


            Lift (or create) the ou:org node representing a country's government based on the 2 letter ISO-3166 country code.

            Examples:

                // Yield the ou:org node which represents the Government of Ukraine.
                gen.pol.country.government ua


Usage: gen.pol.country.government [options] <iso2>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --try                       : Type normalization will fail silently instead of raising an exception.

Arguments:

  <iso2>                      : The 2 letter ISO-3166 country code.

gen.ps.contact.email

The gen.ps.contact.email command locates (lifts) or creates a ps:contact node using the contact’s primary email address (ps:contact:email) and type (ps:contact:type).

Syntax:

storm> gen.ps.contact.email --help


            Lift (or create) the ps:contact node by deconflicting the email and type.

            Examples:

                // Yield the ps:contact node for the type and email
                gen.ps.contact.email vertex.employee [email protected]


Usage: gen.ps.contact.email [options] <type> <email>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --try                       : Type normalization will fail silently instead of raising an exception.

Arguments:

  <type>                      : The contact type.
  <email>                     : The contact email address.

gen.risk.threat

The gen.risk.threat command locates (lifts) or creates a risk:threat node using the name of the threat group (risk:threat:org:name and / or risk:threat:org:names) and the name of the entity reporting on the threat (risk:threat:reporter:name).

Syntax:

storm> gen.risk.threat --help


            Lift (or create) a risk:threat node based on the threat name and reporter name.

            Examples:

                // Yield a risk:threat node for the threat cluster "APT1" reported by "Mandiant".
                gen.risk.threat apt1 mandiant


Usage: gen.risk.threat [options] <name> <reporter>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The name of the threat cluster. For example: APT1
  <reporter>                  : The name of the reporting organization. For example: Mandiant

gen.risk.tool.software

The gen.risk.tool.software command locates (lifts) or creates a risk:tool:software node using the name of the software / malware (risk:tool:software:soft:name and / or risk:software:soft:names) and the name of the entity reporting on the software / malware (risk:tool:software:reporter:name).

Syntax:

storm> gen.risk.tool.software --help


            Lift (or create) a risk:tool:software node based on the tool name and reporter name.

            Examples:

                // Yield a risk:tool:software node for the "redtree" tool reported by "vertex".
                gen.risk.tool.software redtree vertex


Usage: gen.risk.tool.software [options] <name> <reporter>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The tool name.
  <reporter>                  : The name of the reporting organization. For example: "recorded future"

gen.risk.vuln

The gen.risk.vuln command locates (lifts) or creates a risk:tool:vuln node using the Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) number associated with the vulnerability (risk:vuln:cve).

Syntax:

storm> gen.risk.vuln --help


            Lift (or create) a risk:vuln node based on the CVE.


Usage: gen.risk.vuln [options] <cve>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --try                       : Type normalization will fail silently instead of raising an exception.

Arguments:

  <cve>                       : The CVE identifier.

graph

The graph command generates a subgraph based on a specified set of nodes and parameters.

Syntax:

storm> graph --help


    Generate a subgraph from the given input nodes and command line options.

    Example:

        Using the graph command::

            inet:fqdn | graph
                        --degrees 2
                        --filter { -#nope }
                        --pivot { -> meta:seen }
                        --form-pivot inet:fqdn {<- * | limit 20}
                        --form-pivot inet:fqdn {-> * | limit 20}
                        --form-filter inet:fqdn {-inet:fqdn:issuffix=1}
                        --form-pivot syn:tag {-> *}
                        --form-pivot * {-> #}



Usage: graph [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --degrees <degrees>         : How many degrees to graph out. (default: 1)
  --pivot <pivot>             : Specify a storm pivot for all nodes. (must quote) (default: [])
  --filter <filter>           : Specify a storm filter for all nodes. (must quote) (default: [])
  --no-edges                  : Do not include light weight edges in the per-node output.
  --form-pivot <form_pivot>   : Specify a <form> <pivot> form specific pivot. (default: [])
  --form-filter <form_filter> : Specify a <form> <filter> form specific filter. (default: [])
  --refs                      : Do automatic in-model pivoting with node.getNodeRefs().
  --yield-filtered            : Yield nodes which would be filtered. This still performs pivots to collect edge data,but does not yield pivoted nodes.
  --no-filter-input           : Do not drop input nodes if they would match a filter.

iden

The iden command lifts one or more nodes by their node identifier (node ID / iden).

Syntax:

storm> iden --help


    Lift nodes by iden.

    Example:

        iden b25bc9eec7e159dce879f9ec85fb791f83b505ac55b346fcb64c3c51e98d1175 | count


Usage: iden [options] <iden>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  [<iden> ...]                : Iden to lift nodes by. May be specified multiple times.

Example:

  • Lift the node with node ID 20153b758f9d5eaaa38e4f4a65c36da797c3e59e549620fa7c4895e1a920991f:

storm> iden 20153b758f9d5eaaa38e4f4a65c36da797c3e59e549620fa7c4895e1a920991f
inet:ipv4=1.2.3.4
        :type = unicast
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:20.906

intersect

The intersect command returns the intersection of the results from performing a pivot and/or traversal operation on multiple inbound nodes. In other words, intersect will return the subset of results that are common to each of the inbound nodes.

Syntax:

storm> intersect --help


    Yield an intersection of the results of running inbound nodes through a pivot.

    NOTE:
        This command must consume the entire inbound stream to produce the intersection.
        This type of stream consuming before yielding results can cause the query to appear
        laggy in comparison with normal incremental stream operations.

    Examples:

        // Show the it:mitre:attack:technique nodes common to several groups

        it:mitre:attack:group*in=(G0006, G0007) | intersect { -> it:mitre:attack:technique }


Usage: intersect [options] <query>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <query>                     : The pivot query to run each inbound node through.

layer

Storm includes layer.* commands that allow you to work with layers (see Layer).

Help for individual layer.* commands can be displayed using:

<command> --help

layer.add

The layer.add command adds a layer to the Cortex.

Syntax

storm> layer.add --help

Add a layer to the cortex.

Usage: layer.add [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --lockmemory                : Should the layer lock memory for performance.
  --readonly                  : Should the layer be readonly.
  --mirror <mirror>           : A telepath URL of an upstream layer/view to mirror.
  --growsize <growsize>       : Amount to grow the map size when necessary.
  --upstream <upstream>       : One or more telepath urls to receive updates from.
  --name <name>               : The name of the layer.

layer.set

The layer.set command sets an option for the specified layer.

Syntax

storm> layer.set --help

Set a layer option.

Usage: layer.set [options] <iden> <name> <valu>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <iden>                      : Iden of the layer to modify.
  <name>                      : The name of the layer property to set.
  <valu>                      : The value to set the layer property to.

layer.get

The layer.get command retrieves the specified layer from a Cortex.

Syntax

storm> layer.get --help

Get a layer from the cortex.

Usage: layer.get [options] <iden>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  [iden]                      : Iden of the layer to get. If no iden is provided, the main layer will be returned.

layer.list

The layer.list command lists the available layers in a Cortex.

Syntax

storm> layer.list --help

List the layers in the cortex.

Usage: layer.list [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

layer.del

The layer.del command deletes a layer from a Cortex.

Syntax

storm> layer.del --help

Delete a layer from the cortex.

Usage: layer.del [options] <iden>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <iden>                      : Iden of the layer to delete.

layer.pull.add

The layer.pull.add command adds a pull configuration to a layer.

Syntax

storm> layer.pull.add --help

Add a pull configuration to a layer.

Usage: layer.pull.add [options] <layr> <src>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --offset <offset>           : Layer offset to begin pulling from (default: 0)

Arguments:

  <layr>                      : Iden of the layer to pull to.
  <src>                       : Telepath url of the source layer to pull from.

layer.pull.list

The layer.pull.list command lists the pull configurations for a layer.

Syntax

storm> layer.pull.list --help

Get a list of the pull configurations for a layer.

Usage: layer.pull.list [options] <layr>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <layr>                      : Iden of the layer to retrieve pull configurations for.

layer.pull.del

The layer.pull.del command deletes a pull configuration from a layer.

Syntax

storm> layer.pull.del --help

Delete a pull configuration from a layer.

Usage: layer.pull.del [options] <layr> <iden>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <layr>                      : Iden of the layer to modify.
  <iden>                      : Iden of the pull configuration to delete.

layer.push.add

The layer.push.add command adds a push configuration to a layer.

Syntax

storm> layer.push.add --help

Add a push configuration to a layer.

Usage: layer.push.add [options] <layr> <dest>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --offset <offset>           : Layer offset to begin pushing from. (default: 0)

Arguments:

  <layr>                      : Iden of the layer to push from.
  <dest>                      : Telepath url of the layer to push to.

layer.push.list

The layer.push.list command lists the push configurations for a layer.

Syntax

storm> layer.push.list --help

Get a list of the push configurations for a layer.

Usage: layer.push.list [options] <layr>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <layr>                      : Iden of the layer to retrieve push configurations for.

layer.push.del

The layer.push.del command deletes a push configuration from a layer.

Syntax

storm> layer.push.del --help

Delete a push configuration from a layer.

Usage: layer.push.del [options] <layr> <iden>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <layr>                      : Iden of the layer to modify.
  <iden>                      : Iden of the push configuration to delete.

lift

Storm includes lift.* commands that allow you to perform specialized lift operations.

Help for individual lift.* commands can be displayed using:

<command> --help

lift.byverb

The lift.byverb command lifts nodes that are connected by the specified lightweight (light) edge. By default, the command lifts the N1 nodes (i.e., the nodes on the left side of the directional light edge relationship: n1 -(<verb>)> n2)

Note

For other commands associated with light edges, see edges.del and model.edge.* under edges and model respectively.

Syntax:

storm> lift.byverb --help


    Lift nodes from the current view by an light edge verb.

    Examples:

        # Lift all the n1 nodes for the light edge "foo"
        lift.byverb "foo"

        # Lift all the n2 nodes for the light edge "foo"
        lift.byverb --n2 "foo"

    Notes:

        Only a single instance of a node will be yielded from this command
        when that node is lifted via the light edge membership.


Usage: lift.byverb [options] <verb>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --n2                        : Lift by the N2 value instead of N1 value.

Arguments:

  <verb>                      : The edge verb to lift nodes by.

limit

The limit command restricts the number of nodes returned from a given Storm query to the specified number of nodes.

Syntax:

storm> limit --help


    Limit the number of nodes generated by the query in the given position.

    Example:

        inet:ipv4 | limit 10


Usage: limit [options] <count>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <count>                     : The maximum number of nodes to yield.

Example:

  • Lift a single IP address that FireEye associates with the threat group APT1:

storm> inet:ipv4#aka.feye.thr.apt1 | limit 1

Usage Notes:

  • If the limit number specified (i.e., limit 100) is greater than the total number of nodes returned from the Storm query, no limit will be applied to the resultant nodes (i.e., all nodes will be returned).

  • By design, limit imposes an artificial limit on the nodes returned by a query, which may impair effective analysis of data by restricting results. As such, limit is most useful for viewing a subset of a large result set or an exemplar node for a given form.

  • While limit returns a sampling of nodes, it is not statistically random for the purposes of population sampling for algorithmic use.

macro

Note

See the Storm Reference - Automation guide for additional background on macros (as well as triggers and cron jobs), including examples.

Storm includes macro.* commands that allow you to work with macros (see Macro).

Help for individual macro.* commands can be displayed using:

<command> --help

macro.list

The macro.list command lists the macros in a Cortex.

Syntax:

storm> macro.list --help


List the macros set on the cortex.


Usage: macro.list [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

macro.set

The macro.set command creates (or modifies) a macro in a Cortex.

Syntax:

storm> macro.set --help


Set a macro definition in the cortex.

Variables can also be used that are defined outside the definition.

Examples:
    macro.set foobar ${ [+#foo] }

    # Use variable from parent scope
    macro.set bam ${ [ inet:ipv4=$val ] }
    $val=1.2.3.4 macro.exec bam


Usage: macro.set [options] <name> <storm>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The name of the macro to set.
  <storm>                     : The storm command string or embedded query to set.

macro.get

The macro.get command retrieves and displays the specified macro.

Syntax:

storm> macro.get --help


Display the storm query for a macro in the cortex.


Usage: macro.get [options] <name>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The name of the macro to display.

macro.exec

The macro.exec command executes the specified macro.

Syntax:

storm> macro.exec --help


    Execute a named macro.

    Example:

        inet:ipv4#cno.threat.t80 | macro.exec enrich_foo



Usage: macro.exec [options] <name>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The name of the macro to execute

macro.del

The macro.del command deletes the specified macro from a Cortex.

Syntax:

storm> macro.del --help


Remove a macro definition from the cortex.


Usage: macro.del [options] <name>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The name of the macro to delete.

max

The max command returns the node from a given set that contains the highest value for a specified secondary property, tag interval, or variable.

Syntax:

storm> max --help


    Consume nodes and yield only the one node with the highest value for an expression.

    Examples:

        // Yield the file:bytes node with the highest :size property
        file:bytes#foo.bar | max :size

        // Yield the file:bytes node with the highest value for $tick
        file:bytes#foo.bar +.seen ($tick, $tock) = .seen | max $tick

        // Yield the it:dev:str node with the longest length
        it:dev:str | max $lib.len($node.value())



Usage: max [options] <valu>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <valu>                      : The property or variable to use for comparison.

Examples:

  • Return the DNS A record for woot.com with the most recent .seen value:

storm> inet:dns:a:fqdn=woot.com | max .seen
inet:dns:a=('woot.com', '107.21.53.159')
        :fqdn = woot.com
        :ipv4 = 107.21.53.159
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:21.432
        .seen = ('2014/08/13 00:00:00.000', '2014/08/14 00:00:00.000')
  • Return the most recent WHOIS record for domain woot.com:

storm> inet:whois:rec:fqdn=woot.com | max :asof
inet:whois:rec=('woot.com', '2018/05/22 00:00:00.000')
        :asof = 2018/05/22 00:00:00.000
        :fqdn = woot.com
        :text = domain name: woot.com
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:21.505

merge

The merge command takes a subset of nodes from a forked view and merges them down to the next layer. The nodes can optionally be reviewed without actually merging them.

Contrast with view.merge for merging the entire contents of a forked view.

See the view and layer commands for working with views and layers.

Syntax:

storm> merge --help


    Merge edits from the incoming nodes down to the next layer.

    NOTE: This command requires the current view to be a fork.

    NOTE: The arguments for including/excluding tags can accept tag glob
          expressions for specifying tags. For more information on tag glob
          expressions, check the Synapse documentation for $node.globtags().

    Examples:

        // Having tagged a new #cno.mal.redtree subgraph in a forked view...

        #cno.mal.redtree | merge --apply

        // Print out what the merge command *would* do but dont.

        #cno.mal.redtree | merge

        // Merge any org nodes with changes in the top layer.

        diff | +ou:org | merge --apply

        // Merge all tags other than cno.* from ou:org nodes with edits in the
        // top layer.

        diff | +ou:org | merge --only-tags --exclude-tags cno.** --apply

        // Merge only tags rep.vt.* and rep.whoxy.* from ou:org nodes with edits
        // in the top layer.

        diff | +ou:org | merge --include-tags rep.vt.* rep.whoxy.* --apply

        // Lift only inet:ipv4 nodes with a changed :asn property in top layer
        // and merge all changes.

        diff --prop inet:ipv4:asn | merge --apply

        // Lift only nodes with an added #cno.mal.redtree tag in the top layer and merge them.

        diff --tag cno.mal.redtree | merge --apply


Usage: merge [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --apply                     : Execute the merge changes.
  --no-tags                   : Do not merge tags/tagprops or syn:tag nodes.
  --only-tags                 : Only merge tags/tagprops or syn:tag nodes.
  --include-tags [<include_tags> ...]: Include specific tags/tagprops or syn:tag nodes when merging, others are ignored. Tag glob expressions may be used to specify the tags. (default: [])
  --exclude-tags [<exclude_tags> ...]: Exclude specific tags/tagprops or syn:tag nodes from merge.Tag glob expressions may be used to specify the tags. (default: [])
  --include-props [<include_props> ...]: Include specific props when merging, others are ignored. (default: [])
  --exclude-props [<exclude_props> ...]: Exclude specific props from merge. (default: [])
  --diff                      : Enumerate all changes in the current layer.

min

The min command returns the node from a given set that contains the lowest value for a specified secondary property, tag interval, or variable.

Syntax:

storm> min --help


    Consume nodes and yield only the one node with the lowest value for an expression.

    Examples:

        // Yield the file:bytes node with the lowest :size property
        file:bytes#foo.bar | min :size

        // Yield the file:bytes node with the lowest value for $tick
        file:bytes#foo.bar +.seen ($tick, $tock) = .seen | min $tick

        // Yield the it:dev:str node with the shortest length
        it:dev:str | min $lib.len($node.value())



Usage: min [options] <valu>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <valu>                      : The property or variable to use for comparison.

Examples:

  • Return the DNS A record for woot.com with the oldest .seen value:

storm> inet:dns:a:fqdn=woot.com | min .seen
inet:dns:a=('woot.com', '75.101.146.4')
        :fqdn = woot.com
        :ipv4 = 75.101.146.4
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:21.441
        .seen = ('2013/09/21 00:00:00.000', '2013/09/22 00:00:00.000')
  • Return the oldest WHOIS record for domain woot.com:

storm> inet:whois:rec:fqdn=woot.com | min :asof
inet:whois:rec=('woot.com', '2018/05/22 00:00:00.000')
        :asof = 2018/05/22 00:00:00.000
        :fqdn = woot.com
        :text = domain name: woot.com
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:21.505

model

Storm includes model.* commands that allow you to work with model elements.

model.deprecated.* commands allow you to view model elements (forms or properties) that have been marked as “deprecated”, determine whether your Cortex contains deprecated nodes / nodes with deprecated properties, and optionally lock / unlock those properties to prevent (or allow) continued creation of deprecated model elements.

model.edge.* commands allow you to work with lightweight (light) edges. (See also the edges.del and lift.byverb commands under edges and lift, respectively.)

Help for individual model.* commands can be displayed using:

<command> --help

model.deprecated.check

The model.deprecated.check command lists deprecated elements, their lock status, and whether deprecated elements exist in the Cortex.

Syntax:

storm> model.deprecated.check --help

Check for lock status and the existence of deprecated model elements

Usage: model.deprecated.check [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

model.deprecated.lock

The model.deprecated.lock command allows you to lock or unlock (e.g., disallow or allow the use of) deprecated model elements in a Cortex.

Syntax:

storm> model.deprecated.lock --help

Edit lock status of deprecated model elements.

Usage: model.deprecated.lock [options] <name>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --unlock                    : Unlock rather than lock the deprecated property.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The deprecated form or property name to lock or * to lock all.

model.deprecated.locks

The model.deprecated.locks command displays the lock status of all deprecated model elements.

Syntax:

storm> model.deprecated.locks --help

Display lock status of deprecated model elements.

Usage: model.deprecated.locks [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

model.edge.list

The model.edge.list command displays the set of light edges currently defined in the Cortex and any doc values set on them.

Syntax:

storm> model.edge.list --help

List all edge verbs in the current view and their doc key (if set).

Usage: model.edge.list [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

model.edge.set

The model.edge.set command allows you to set the value of a given key on a light edge (such as a doc value to specify a definition for the light edge). The current list of valid keys include the following:

  • doc

Syntax:

storm> model.edge.set --help

Set a key-value for an edge verb that exists in the current view.

Usage: model.edge.set [options] <verb> <key> <valu>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <verb>                      : The edge verb to add a key to.
  <key>                       : The key name (e.g. doc).
  <valu>                      : The string value to set.

model.edge.get

The model.edge.get command allows you to retrieve all of the keys that have been set on a light edge.

Syntax:

storm> model.edge.get --help

Retrieve key-value pairs for an edge verb in the current view.

Usage: model.edge.get [options] <verb>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <verb>                      : The edge verb to retrieve.

model.edge.del

The model.edge.del command allows you to delete the key from a light edge (such as a doc property to specify a definition for the light edge). Deleting a key from a specific light edge does not delete the key from Synapse (e.g., the property can be re-added to the light edge or to other light edges).

Syntax:

storm> model.edge.del --help

Delete a global key-value pair for an edge verb in the current view.

Usage: model.edge.del [options] <verb> <key>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <verb>                      : The edge verb to delete documentation for.
  <key>                       : The key name (e.g. doc).

movenodes

The movenodes command allows you to move nodes between layers (Layer) in a Cortex.

The command will move the specified storage nodes (see Node, Storage) - “sodes” for short - to the target layer. If a sode is the “left hand” (n1) of two nodes joined by a light edge (n1 -(*)> n2), then the edge is also moved.

Sodes are fully removed from the source layer(s) and added to (or merged with existing nodes in) the target layer. The history of the node (i.e., changes to the node, timestamps, associated user) in the source layer is preserved; the changes written to the target layer are owned by the user executing the movenodes command.

By default (i.e., if you do not specify a source and / or target layer), movenodes will migrate sodes from the bottom layer in the view, through each intervening layer (if any), and finally into the top layer. If you explicitly specify a source and target layer, movenodes migrates the sodes directly from the source to the target, skipping any intervening layers (if any).

Similarly, by default as the node is moved “up”, any data for that node (property values, tags) in the higher layer will take precedence over (overwrite) data from a lower layer. This precedence behavior can be modified with the appropriate command switch.

The movenodes command is intended for use in the same layer stack. See the copyto command to copy nodes from a view to the write layer in a specified target view.

Note

The merge command specifically moves (merges) nodes from the top layer in a View to the underlying layer. Merging is a common user action performed in a standard “fork and merge” workflow. The merge command should be used to move/merge nodes down from a higher layer/view to a lower/underlying one.

The movenodes command allows you to move nodes between arbitrary layers and is meant to be used by Synapse administrators in very specific use cases (e.g., data that was accidentally merged into a lower layer that should not be there). It can be used to move nodes “up” from a lower layer to a higher one.

Syntax:

storm> movenodes --help


    Move storage nodes between layers.

    Storage nodes will be removed from the source layers and the resulting
    storage node in the destination layer will contain the merged values (merged
    in bottom up layer order by default).

    Examples:

        // Move storage nodes for ou:org nodes to the top layer

        ou:org | movenodes --apply

        // Print out what the movenodes command *would* do but dont.

        ou:org | movenodes

        // In a view with many layers, only move storage nodes from the bottom layer
        // to the top layer.

        $layers = $lib.view.get().layers
        $top = $layers.0.iden
        $bot = $layers."-1".iden

        ou:org | movenodes --srclayers $bot --destlayer $top

        // In a view with many layers, move storage nodes to the top layer and
        // prioritize values from the bottom layer over the other layers.

        $layers = $lib.view.get().layers
        $top = $layers.0.iden
        $mid = $layers.1.iden
        $bot = $layers.2.iden

        ou:org | movenodes --precedence $bot $top $mid


Usage: movenodes [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --apply                     : Execute the move changes.
  --srclayers [<srclayers> ...]: Specify layers to move storage nodes from (defaults to all below the top layer) (default: None)
  --destlayer <destlayer>     : Layer to move storage nodes to (defaults to the top layer) (default: None)
  --precedence [<precedence> ...]: Layer precedence for resolving conflicts (defaults to bottom up) (default: None)

movetag

The movetag command moves a Synapse tag and its associated tag tree from one location in a tag hierarchy to another location. It is equivalent to “renaming” a given tag and all of its subtags. Moving a tag consists of:

  • Creating the new syn:tag node(s).

  • Copying the definitions (:title and :doc properties) from the old syn:tag node to the new syn:tag node.

  • Applying the new tag(s) to the nodes with the old tag(s).

    • If the old tag(s) have associated timestamps / time intervals, they will be applied to the new tag(s).

  • Deleting the old tag(s) from the nodes.

  • Setting the :isnow property of the old syn:tag node(s) to reference the new syn:tag node.

    • The old syn:tag nodes are not deleted.

    • Once the :isnow property is set, attempts to apply the old tag will automatically result in the new tag being applied.

See also the tag command.

Syntax:

storm> movetag --help


    Rename an entire tag tree and preserve time intervals.

    Example:

        movetag foo.bar baz.faz.bar


Usage: movetag [options] <oldtag> <newtag>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <oldtag>                    : The tag tree to rename.
  <newtag>                    : The new tag tree name.

Examples:

  • Move the tag named #research to #internal.research:

storm> movetag research internal.research
moved tags on 1 nodes.
  • Move the tag tree #aka.fireeye.malware to #rep.feye.mal:

storm> movetag aka.fireeye.malware rep.feye.mal
moved tags on 1 nodes.

Usage Notes:

Warning

movetag should be used with caution as when used incorrectly it can result in “deleted” (inadvertently moved / removed) or orphaned (inadvertently retained) tags. For example, in the second example query above, all aka.fireeye.malware tags are renamed rep.feye.mal, but the tag aka.fireeye still exists and is still applied to all of the original nodes. In other words, the result of the above command will be that nodes previously tagged aka.fireeye.malware will now be tagged both rep.feye.mal and aka.fireeye. Users may wish to test the command on sample data first to understand its effects before applying it in a production Cortex.

nodes

Storm includes nodes.* commands that allow you to work with nodes and .nodes files.

Help for individual nodes.* commands can be displayed using:

<command> --help

nodes.import

The nodes.import command will import a Synapse .nodes file (i.e., a file containing a set / subgraph of nodes, light edges, and / or tags exported from a Cortex) from a specified URL.

Syntax:

storm> nodes.import --help

Import a nodes file hosted at a URL into the cortex. Yields created nodes.

Usage: nodes.import [options] <urls>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --no-ssl-verify             : Ignore SSL certificate validation errors.

Arguments:

  [<urls> ...]                : URL(s) to fetch nodes file from

note

Storm includes note.* commands that allow you to work with free form text notes (meta:note nodes).

Help for individual note.* commands can be displayed using:

<command> --help

note.add

The note.add command will create a meta:note node containing the specified text and link it to the inbound node(s) via an -(about)> light edge (i.e., meta:note=<guid> -(about)> <node(s)>).

Syntax:

storm> note.add --help

Add a new meta:note node and link it to the inbound nodes using an -(about)> edge.

Usage: note.add [options] <text>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --type <type>               : The note type.
  --yield                     : Yield the newly created meta:note node.

Arguments:

  <text>                      : The note text to add to the nodes.

Usage Notes:

Note

Synapse’s data and analytical models are meant to represent a broad range of data and information in a structured (and therefore queryable) way. As free form notes are counter to this structured approach, we recommend using meta:note nodes as an exception rather than a regular practice.

once

The once command is used to ensure a given node is processed by the associated Storm command only once, even if the same command is executed in a different, independent Storm query. The once command uses Node Data to keep track of the associated Storm command’s execution, so once is specific to the View in which it is executed. You can override the single-execution feature of once with the --asof parameter.

Syntax:

storm> once --help


    The once command is used to filter out nodes which have already been processed
    via the use of a named key. It includes an optional parameter to allow the node
    to pass the filter again after a given amount of time.

    For example, to run an enrichment command on a set of nodes just once:

        file:bytes#my.files | once enrich:foo | enrich.foo

    The once command filters out any nodes which have previously been through any other
    use of the "once" command using the same <name> (in this case "enrich:foo").

    You may also specify the --asof option to allow nodes to pass the filter after a given
    amount of time. For example, the following command will allow any given node through
    every 2 days:

        file:bytes#my.files | once enrich:foo --asof "-2 days" | enrich.foo

    Use of "--asof now" or any future date or positive relative time offset will always
    allow the node to pass the filter.

    State tracking data for the once command is stored as nodedata which is stored in your
    view's write layer, making it view-specific. So if you have two views, A and B, and they
    do not share any layers between them, and you execute this query in view A:

        inet:ipv4=8.8.8.8 | once enrich:address | enrich.baz

    And then you run it in view B, the node will still pass through the once command to the
    enrich.baz portion of the query because the tracking data for the once command does not
    yet exist in view B.


Usage: once [options] <name>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --asof <asof>               : The associated time the name was updated/performed. (default: None)

Arguments:

  <name>                      : Name of the action to only perform once.

parallel

The Storm parallel command allows you to execute a Storm query using a specified number of query pipelines. This can improve performance for some queries.

See also background.

Syntax:

storm> parallel --help


    Execute part of a query pipeline in parallel.
    This can be useful to minimize round-trip delay during enrichments.

    Examples:
        inet:ipv4#foo | parallel { $place = $lib.import(foobar).lookup(:latlong) [ :place=$place ] }

    NOTE: Storm variables set within the parallel query pipelines do not interact.


Usage: parallel [options] <query>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --size <size>               : The number of parallel Storm pipelines to execute. (default: 8)

Arguments:

  <query>                     : The query to execute in parallel.

pkg

Storm includes pkg.* commands that allow you to work with Storm packages (see Package).

Help for individual pkg.* commands can be displayed using:

<command> --help

Packages typically contain Storm commands and Storm library code used to implement a Storm Service.

pkg.list

The pkg.list command lists each Storm package loaded in the Cortex. Output is displayed in tabular form and includes the package name and version information.

Syntax:

storm> pkg.list --help

List the storm packages loaded in the cortex.

Usage: pkg.list [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

pkg.load

The pgk.load command loads the specified package into the Cortex.

Syntax:

storm> pkg.load --help

Load a storm package from an HTTP URL.

Usage: pkg.load [options] <url>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --raw                       : Response JSON is a raw package definition without an envelope.
  --verify                    : Enforce code signature verification on the storm package.
  --ssl-noverify              : Specify to disable SSL verification of the server.

Arguments:

  <url>                       : The HTTP URL to load the package from.

pkg.del

The pkg.del command removes a Storm package from the Cortex.

Syntax:

storm> pkg.del --help

Remove a storm package from the cortex.

Usage: pkg.del [options] <name>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The name (or name prefix) of the package to remove.

pkg.docs

The pkg.docs command displays the documentation for a Storm package.

Syntax:

storm> pkg.docs --help

Display documentation included in a storm package.

Usage: pkg.docs [options] <name>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The name (or name prefix) of the package.

pkg.perms.list

The pkg.perms.list command lists the permissions declared by a Storm package.

Syntax:

storm> pkg.perms.list --help

List any permissions declared by the package.

Usage: pkg.perms.list [options] <name>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The name (or name prefix) of the package.

ps

Storm includes ps.* commands that allow you to work with Storm tasks/queries.

Help for individual ps.* commands can be displayed using:

<command> --help

ps.list

The ps.list command lists the currently executing tasks/queries. By default, the command displays the first 120 characters of the executing query. The --verbose option can be used to display the full query regardless of length.

Syntax:

storm> ps.list --help

List running tasks in the cortex.

Usage: ps.list [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --verbose                   : Enable verbose output.

ps.kill

The ps.kill command can be used to terminate an executing task/query. The command requires the Iden of the task to be terminated, which can be obtained with ps.list.

Syntax:

storm> ps.kill --help

Kill a running task/query within the cortex.

Usage: ps.kill [options] <iden>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <iden>                      : Any prefix that matches exactly one valid process iden is accepted.

queue

Storm includes queue.* commands that allow you to work with queues (see Queue).

Help for individual queue.* commands can be displayed using:

<command> --help

queue.add

The queue.add command adds a queue to the Cortex.

Syntax:

storm> queue.add --help

Add a queue to the cortex.

Usage: queue.add [options] <name>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The name of the new queue.

queue.list

The queue.list command lists each queue in the Cortex.

Syntax:

storm> queue.list --help

List the queues in the cortex.

Usage: queue.list [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

queue.del

The queue.del command removes a queue from the Cortex.

Syntax:

storm> queue.del --help

Remove a queue from the cortex.

Usage: queue.del [options] <name>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The name of the queue to remove.

reindex

The reindex command is currently reserved for future use.

The intended purpose of this administrative command is to reindex a given node property. This may be necessary as part of a manual data migration.

Note

Any changes to the Synapse data model are noted in the changelog for the relevant Synapse release. Changes that require data migration are specifically noted and the data migration is typically performed automatically when deploying the new version. See the Data Migration section of the Synapse Devops Guide for additional detail.

Syntax:

storm> reindex --help


    Use admin privileges to re index/normalize node properties.

    NOTE: Currently does nothing but is reserved for future use.


Usage: reindex [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

runas

The runas command allows you to execute a Storm query as a specified user.

Note

The runas commmand requires admin permisisons.

Syntax:

storm> runas --help


    Execute a storm query as a specified user.

    NOTE: This command requires admin privileges.

    Examples:

        // Create a node as another user.
        runas someuser { [ inet:fqdn=foo.com ] }


Usage: runas [options] <user> <storm>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --asroot                    : Propagate asroot to query subruntime.

Arguments:

  <user>                      : The user name or iden to execute the storm query as.
  <storm>                     : The storm query to execute.

scrape

The scrape command parses one or more secondary properties of the inbound node(s) and attempts to identify (“scrape”) common forms from the content, creating the nodes if they do not already exist. This is useful (for example) for extracting forms such as email addresses, domains, URLs, hashes, etc. from unstructured text.

The --refs switch can be used to optionally link the source nodes(s) to the scraped forms via refs light edges.

By default, the scrape command will return the nodes that it received as input. The --yield option can be used to return the scraped nodes rather than the input nodes.

Syntax:

storm> scrape --help


    Use textual properties of existing nodes to find other easily recognizable nodes.

    Examples:

        # Scrape properties from inbound nodes and create standalone nodes.
        inet:search:query | scrape

        # Scrape properties from inbound nodes and make refs light edges to the scraped nodes.
        inet:search:query | scrape --refs

        # Scrape only the :engine and :text props from the inbound nodes.
        inet:search:query | scrape :text :engine

        # Scrape properties inbound nodes and yield newly scraped nodes.
        inet:search:query | scrape --yield

        # Skip re-fanging text before scraping.
        inet:search:query | scrape --skiprefang

        # Limit scrape to specific forms.
        inet:search:query | scrape --forms (inet:fqdn, inet:ipv4)


Usage: scrape [options] <values>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --refs                      : Create refs light edges to any scraped nodes from the input node
  --yield                     : Include newly scraped nodes in the output
  --skiprefang                : Do not remove de-fanging from text before scraping
  --forms <forms>             : Only scrape values which match specific forms. (default: [])

Arguments:

  [<values> ...]              : Specific relative properties or variables to scrape

Example:

  • Scrape the text of WHOIS records for the domain woot.com and create nodes for common forms found in the text:

storm> inet:whois:rec:fqdn=woot.com | scrape :text
inet:whois:rec=('woot.com', '2018/05/22 00:00:00.000')
        :asof = 2018/05/22 00:00:00.000
        :fqdn = woot.com
        :text = domain name: woot.com
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:21.505

Usage Notes:

  • If no properties to scrape are specified, scrape will attempt to scrape all properties of the inbound nodes by default.

  • scrape will only scrape node properties; it will not scrape files (this includes files that may be referenced by properties, such as media:news:file). In other words, scrape cannot be used to parse indicators from a file such as a PDF.

  • scrape extracts the following forms / indicators (note that this list may change as the command is updated):

    • FQDNs

    • IPv4s

    • Servers (IPv4 / port combinations)

    • Hashes (MD5, SHA1, SHA256)

    • URLs

    • Email addresses

    • Cryptocurrency addresses

  • scrape is able to recognize and account for common “defanging” techniques (such as evildomain[.]com, myemail[@]somedomain.net, or hxxp://badwebsite.org/), and will scrape “defanged” indicators by default. Use the --skiprefang switch to ignore defanged indicators.

service

Storm includes service.* commands that allow you to work with Storm services (see Service).

Help for individual service.* commands can be displayed using:

<command> --help

service.add

The service.add command adds a Storm service to the Cortex.

Syntax:

storm> service.add --help

Add a storm service to the cortex.

Usage: service.add [options] <name> <url>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The name of the service.
  <url>                       : The telepath URL for the remote service.

service.list

The service.list command lists each Storm service in the Cortex.

Syntax:

storm> service.list --help

List the storm services configured in the cortex.

Usage: service.list [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

service.del

The service.del command removes a Storm service from the Cortex.

Syntax:

storm> service.del --help

Remove a storm service from the cortex.

Usage: service.del [options] <iden>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <iden>                      : The service identifier or prefix.

sleep

The sleep command adds a delay in returning each result for a given Storm query. By default, query results are streamed back and displayed as soon as they arrive for optimal performance. A sleep delay effectively slows the display of results.

Syntax:

storm> sleep --help


    Introduce a delay between returning each result for the storm query.

    NOTE: This is mostly used for testing / debugging.

    Example:

        #foo.bar | sleep 0.5



Usage: sleep [options] <delay>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <delay>                     : Delay in floating point seconds.

Example:

  • Retrieve email nodes from a Cortex every second:

storm> inet:email | sleep 1.0
inet:[email protected]
        :fqdn = gmail.com
        :user = bar
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:22.426
inet:[email protected]
        :fqdn = gmail.com
        :user = baz
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:22.432
inet:[email protected]
        :fqdn = gmail.com
        :user = foo
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:22.419

spin

The spin command is used to suppress the output of a Storm query. Spin simply consumes all nodes sent to the command, so no nodes are output to the CLI. This allows you to execute a Storm query and view messages and results without displaying the associated nodes.

Syntax:

storm> spin --help


    Iterate through all query results, but do not yield any.
    This can be used to operate on many nodes without returning any.

    Example:

        foo:bar:size=20 [ +#hehe ] | spin



Usage: spin [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Example:

  • Add the tag #int.research to any domain containing the string “firefox” but do not display the nodes.

storm> inet:fqdn~=firefox [+#int.research] | spin

stats

Storm includes stats.* commands that allow you to query and work with statistics.

Help for individual stats.* commands can be displayed using:

<command> --help

stats.countby

The stats.countby command allows you to query and display a bar chart of tallied data in the Storm CLI.

Syntax:

storm> stats.countby --help


    Tally occurrences of values and display a bar chart of the results.

    Examples:

        // Show counts of geo:name values referenced by media:news nodes.
        media:news -(refs)> geo:name | stats.countby

        // Show counts of ASN values in a set of IPs.
        inet:ipv4#myips | stats.countby :asn

        // Show counts of attacker names for risk:compromise nodes.
        risk:compromise | stats.countby :attacker::name


Usage: stats.countby [options] <valu>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --reverse                   : Display results in ascending instead of descending order.
  --size <size>               : Maximum number of bars to display. (default: None)
  --char <char>               : Character to use for bars. (default: #)
  --bar-width <bar_width>     : Width of the bars to display. (default: 50)
  --label-max-width <label_max_width>: Maximum width of the labels to display. (default: None)
  --yield                     : Yield inbound nodes.
  --by-name                   : Print stats sorted by name instead of count.

Arguments:

  [valu]                      : A relative property or variable to tally.

tag

Storm includes tag.* commands that allow you to work with tags (see Tag).

Help for individual tag.* commands can be displayed using:

<command> --help

See also the related movetag command.

tag.prune

The tag.prune command will delete the tags from incoming nodes, as well as all of their parent tags that don’t have other tags as children.

Syntax:

storm> tag.prune --help


    Prune a tag (or tags) from nodes.

    This command will delete the tags specified as parameters from incoming nodes,
    as well as all of their parent tags that don't have other tags as children.

    For example, given a node with the tags:

        #parent
        #parent.child
        #parent.child.grandchild

    Pruning the parent.child.grandchild tag would remove all tags. If the node had
    the tags:

        #parent
        #parent.child
        #parent.child.step
        #parent.child.grandchild

    Pruning the parent.child.grandchild tag will only remove the parent.child.grandchild
    tag as the parent tags still have other children.

    Examples:

        # Prune the parent.child.grandchild tag
        inet:ipv4=1.2.3.4 | tag.prune parent.child.grandchild


Usage: tag.prune [options] <tags>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  [<tags> ...]                : Names of tags to prune.

tee

The tee command executes multiple Storm queries on the inbound nodes and returns the combined result set.

Syntax:

storm> tee --help


    Execute multiple Storm queries on each node in the input stream, joining output streams together.

    Commands are executed in order they are given; unless the ``--parallel`` switch is provided.

    Examples:

        # Perform a pivot out and pivot in on a inet:ivp4 node
        inet:ipv4=1.2.3.4 | tee { -> * } { <- * }

        # Also emit the inbound node
        inet:ipv4=1.2.3.4 | tee --join { -> * } { <- * }

        # Execute multiple enrichment queries in parallel.
        inet:ipv4=1.2.3.4 | tee -p { enrich.foo } { enrich.bar } { enrich.baz }



Usage: tee [options] <query>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --join                      : Emit inbound nodes after processing storm queries.
  --parallel                  : Run the storm queries in parallel instead of sequence. The node output order is not guaranteed.

Arguments:

  [<query> ...]               : Specify a query to execute on the input nodes.

Examples:

  • Return the set of domains and IP addresses associated with a set of DNS A records.

storm> inet:fqdn:zone=mydomain.com -> inet:dns:a | tee { -> inet:fqdn } { -> inet:ipv4 }
inet:fqdn=baz.mydomain.com
        :domain = mydomain.com
        :host = baz
        :issuffix = false
        :iszone = false
        :zone = mydomain.com
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:25.647
inet:ipv4=127.0.0.2
        :type = loopback
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:25.647
inet:fqdn=foo.mydomain.com
        :domain = mydomain.com
        :host = foo
        :issuffix = false
        :iszone = false
        :zone = mydomain.com
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:25.631
inet:ipv4=8.8.8.8
        :type = unicast
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:25.631
inet:fqdn=bar.mydomain.com
        :domain = mydomain.com
        :host = bar
        :issuffix = false
        :iszone = false
        :zone = mydomain.com
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:25.639
inet:ipv4=34.56.78.90
        :type = unicast
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:25.639
  • Return the set of domains and IP addresses associated with a set of DNS A records along with the original DNS A records.

storm> inet:fqdn:zone=mydomain.com -> inet:dns:a | tee --join { -> inet:fqdn } { -> inet:ipv4 }
inet:fqdn=baz.mydomain.com
        :domain = mydomain.com
        :host = baz
        :issuffix = false
        :iszone = false
        :zone = mydomain.com
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:25.647
inet:ipv4=127.0.0.2
        :type = loopback
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:25.647
inet:dns:a=('baz.mydomain.com', '127.0.0.2')
        :fqdn = baz.mydomain.com
        :ipv4 = 127.0.0.2
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:25.647
inet:fqdn=foo.mydomain.com
        :domain = mydomain.com
        :host = foo
        :issuffix = false
        :iszone = false
        :zone = mydomain.com
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:25.631
inet:ipv4=8.8.8.8
        :type = unicast
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:25.631
inet:dns:a=('foo.mydomain.com', '8.8.8.8')
        :fqdn = foo.mydomain.com
        :ipv4 = 8.8.8.8
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:25.631
inet:fqdn=bar.mydomain.com
        :domain = mydomain.com
        :host = bar
        :issuffix = false
        :iszone = false
        :zone = mydomain.com
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:25.639
inet:ipv4=34.56.78.90
        :type = unicast
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:25.639
inet:dns:a=('bar.mydomain.com', '34.56.78.90')
        :fqdn = bar.mydomain.com
        :ipv4 = 34.56.78.90
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:25.639

Usage Notes:

  • tee can take an arbitrary number of Storm queries (i.e., 1 to n queries) as arguments.

tree

The tree command recursively performs the specified pivot until no additional nodes are returned.

Syntax:

storm> tree --help


    Walk elements of a tree using a recursive pivot.

    Examples:

        # pivot upward yielding each FQDN
        inet:fqdn=www.vertex.link | tree { :domain -> inet:fqdn }


Usage: tree [options] <query>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <query>                     : The pivot query

Example:

  • List the full set of tags in the “TTP” tag hierarchy.

storm> syn:tag=ttp | tree { $node.value() -> syn:tag:up }
syn:tag=ttp
        :base = ttp
        :depth = 0
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:25.780
syn:tag=ttp.phish
        :base = phish
        :depth = 1
        :up = ttp
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:25.792
syn:tag=ttp.phish.payload
        :base = payload
        :depth = 2
        :up = ttp.phish
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:25.792
syn:tag=ttp.opsec
        :base = opsec
        :depth = 1
        :up = ttp
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:25.780
syn:tag=ttp.opsec.anon
        :base = anon
        :depth = 2
        :up = ttp.opsec
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:25.780
syn:tag=ttp.se
        :base = se
        :depth = 1
        :up = ttp
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:25.786
syn:tag=ttp.se.masq
        :base = masq
        :depth = 2
        :up = ttp.se
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:25.786

Usage Notes:

  • tree is useful for “walking” a set of properties with a single command vs. performing an arbitrary number of pivots until the end of the data is reached.

trigger

Note

See the Storm Reference - Automation guide for additional background on triggers (as well as cron jobs and macros), including examples.

Storm includes trigger.* commands that allow you to create automated event-driven triggers (see Trigger) using the Storm query syntax.

Help for individual trigger.* commands can be displayed using:

<command> --help

Triggers are added to the Cortex as runtime nodes (“runt nodes” - see Node, Runt) of the form syn:trigger. These runt nodes can be lifted and filtered just like standard nodes in Synapse.

trigger.add

The trigger.add command adds a trigger to a Cortex.

Syntax:

storm> trigger.add --help


Add a trigger to the cortex.

Notes:
    Valid values for condition are:
        * tag:add
        * tag:del
        * node:add
        * node:del
        * prop:set
        * edge:add
        * edge:del

When condition is tag:add or tag:del, you may optionally provide a form name
to restrict the trigger to fire only on tags added or deleted from nodes of
those forms.

The added tag is provided to the query as an embedded variable '$tag'.

Simple one level tag globbing is supported, only at the end after a period,
that is aka.* matches aka.foo and aka.bar but not aka.foo.bar. aka* is not
supported.

When the condition is edge:add or edge:del, you may optionally provide a
form name or a destination form name to only fire on edges added or deleted
from nodes of those forms.

Examples:
    # Adds a tag to every inet:ipv4 added
    trigger.add node:add --form inet:ipv4 --query {[ +#mytag ]}

    # Adds a tag #todo to every node as it is tagged #aka
    trigger.add tag:add --tag aka --query {[ +#todo ]}

    # Adds a tag #todo to every inet:ipv4 as it is tagged #aka
    trigger.add tag:add --form inet:ipv4 --tag aka --query {[ +#todo ]}

    # Adds a tag #todo to the N1 node of every refs edge add
    trigger.add edge:add --verb refs --query {[ +#todo ]}

    # Adds a tag #todo to the N1 node of every seen edge delete, provided that
    # both nodes are of form file:bytes
    trigger.add edge:del --verb seen --form file:bytes --n2form file:bytes --query {[ +#todo ]}


Usage: trigger.add [options] <condition>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --form <form>               : Form to fire on.
  --tag <tag>                 : Tag to fire on.
  --prop <prop>               : Property to fire on.
  --verb <verb>               : Edge verb to fire on.
  --n2form <n2form>           : The form of the n2 node to fire on.
  --query <storm>             : Query for the trigger to execute.
  --async                     : Make the trigger run in the background.
  --disabled                  : Create the trigger in disabled state.
  --name <name>               : Human friendly name of the trigger.
  --view <view>               : The view to add the trigger to.

Arguments:

  <condition>                 : Condition for the trigger.

trigger.list

The trigger-list command displays the set of triggers in the Cortex that the current user can view / modify based on their permissions. Triggers are displayed at the Storm CLI in tabular format, with columns including the user who created the trigger, the Iden of the trigger, the condition that fires the trigger (i.e., node:add), and the Storm query associated with the trigger.

Triggers are displayed in alphanumeric order by iden. Triggers are sorted upon Cortex initialization, so newly-created triggers will be displayed at the bottom of the list until the list is re-sorted the next time the Cortex is restarted.

Note

Triggers can also be viewed in runt node form as syn:trigger nodes.

Syntax:

storm> trigger.list --help

List existing triggers in the cortex.

Usage: trigger.list [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --all                       : List every trigger in every readable view, rather than just the current view.

trigger.mod

The trigger.mod command modifies the Storm query associated with a specific trigger. To modify a trigger, you must provide the first portion of the trigger’s iden (i.e., enough of the iden that the trigger can be uniquely identified), which can be obtained using trigger.list or by lifting the appropriate syn:trigger node.

Note

Other aspects of the trigger, such as the condition used to fire the trigger or the tag or property associated with the trigger, cannot be modified once the trigger has been created. To change these aspects, you must delete and re-add the trigger.

Syntax:

storm> trigger.mod --help

Modify an existing trigger's query.

Usage: trigger.mod [options] <iden> <query>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <iden>                      : Any prefix that matches exactly one valid trigger iden is accepted.
  <query>                     : New storm query for the trigger.

trigger.disable

The trigger.disable command disables a trigger and prevents it from firing without removing it from the Cortex. To disable a trigger, you must provide the first portion of the trigger’s iden (i.e., enough of the iden that the trigger can be uniquely identified), which can be obtained using trigger.list or by lifting the appropriate syn:trigger node.

Syntax:

storm> trigger.disable --help

Disable a trigger in the cortex.

Usage: trigger.disable [options] <iden>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <iden>                      : Any prefix that matches exactly one valid trigger iden is accepted.

trigger.enable

The trigger-enable command enables a disabled trigger. To enable a trigger, you must provide the first portion of the trigger’s iden (i.e., enough of the iden that the trigger can be uniquely identified), which can be obtained using trigger.list or by lifting the appropriate syn:trigger node.

Note

Triggers are enabled by default upon creation.

Syntax:

storm> trigger.enable --help

Enable a trigger in the cortex.

Usage: trigger.enable [options] <iden>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <iden>                      : Any prefix that matches exactly one valid trigger iden is accepted.

trigger.del

The trigger.del command permanently removes a trigger from the Cortex. To delete a trigger, you must provide the first portion of the trigger’s iden (i.e., enough of the iden that the trigger can be uniquely identified), which can be obtained using trigger.list or by lifting the appropriate syn:trigger node.

Syntax:

storm> trigger.del --help

Delete a trigger from the cortex.

Usage: trigger.del [options] <iden>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <iden>                      : Any prefix that matches exactly one valid trigger iden is accepted.

uniq

The uniq command removes duplicate results from a Storm query. Results are uniqued based on each node’s node identifier (node ID / iden) so that only the first node with a given node ID is returned.

Syntax:

storm> uniq --help


    Filter nodes by their uniq iden values.
    When this is used a Storm pipeline, only the first instance of a
    given node is allowed through the pipeline.

    A relative property or variable may also be specified, which will cause
    this command to only allow through the first node with a given value for
    that property or value rather than checking the node iden.

    Examples:

        # Filter duplicate nodes after pivoting from inet:ipv4 nodes tagged with #badstuff
        #badstuff +inet:ipv4 ->* | uniq

        # Unique inet:ipv4 nodes by their :asn property
        #badstuff +inet:ipv4 | uniq :asn


Usage: uniq [options] <value>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  [value]                     : A relative property or variable to uniq by.

Examples:

  • Lift all of the unique IP addresses that domains associated with the Fancy Bear threat group have resolved to:

storm> inet:fqdn#rep.threatconnect.fancybear -> inet:dns:a -> inet:ipv4 | uniq
inet:ipv4=111.90.148.124
        :type = unicast
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:26.058
inet:ipv4=209.99.40.222
        :type = unicast
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:26.067
inet:ipv4=141.8.224.221
        :type = unicast
        .created = 2024/02/28 20:06:26.075

uptime

The uptime command displays the uptime for the Cortex or specified service.

Syntax:

storm> uptime --help

Print the uptime for the Cortex or a connected service.

Usage: uptime [options] <name>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  [name]                      : The name, or iden, of the service (if not provided defaults to the Cortex).

vault

Storm includes vault.* commands that allow you to create and manage vaults (see Vault).

Help for individual vault.* commands can be displayed using:

<command> --help

vault.add

The vault.add command creates a new vault.

Syntax:

storm> vault.add --help


            Add a vault.

            Examples:

                // Add a global vault with type `synapse-test`
                vault.add "shared-global-vault" synapse-test ({'apikey': 'foobar'}) ({}) --global

                // Add a user vault with type `synapse-test`
                vault.add "visi-user-vault" synapse-test ({'apikey': 'barbaz'}) ({}) --user visi

                // Add a role vault with type `synapse-test`
                vault.add "contributor-role-vault" synapse-test ({'apikey': 'bazquux'}) ({}) --role contributor

                // Add an unscoped vault with type `synapse-test`
                vault.add "unscoped-vault" synapse-test ({'apikey': 'quuxquo'}) ({'server': 'api.foobar.com'}) --unscoped visi


Usage: vault.add [options] <name> <type> <secrets> <configs>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --user <user>               : This vault is a user-scoped vault, for the specified user name.
  --role <role>               : This vault is a role-scoped vault, for the specified role name.
  --unscoped <unscoped>       : This vault is an unscoped vault, for the specified user name.
  --global                    : This vault is a global-scoped vault.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The vault name.
  <type>                      : The vault type.
  <secrets>                   : The secrets to store in the new vault.
  <configs>                   : The configs to store in the new vault.

vault.list

The vault.list command displays the available vaults.

Syntax:

storm> vault.list --help


            List available vaults.


Usage: vault.list [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --name <name>               : Only list vaults with the specified name or iden.
  --type <type>               : Only list vaults with the specified type.
  --showsecrets               : Print vault secrets.

vault.set.configs

The vault.set.configs sets configuration options for the specified vault.

Syntax:

storm> vault.set.configs --help


            Set vault config data.

            Examples:

                // Set data to visi's user vault configs
                vault.set.configs "visi-user-vault" color --value orange

                // Set data to contributor's role vault configs
                vault.set.configs "contributor-role-vault" color --value blue

                // Remove apikey from a global vault configs
                vault.set.configs "some-global-vault" color --delete


Usage: vault.set.configs [options] <name> <key>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --value <value>             : The config value to store in the vault.
  --delete                    : Specify this flag to remove the config from the vault.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The vault name or iden.
  <key>                       : The key for the config value.

vault.set.perm

The vault.set.perm command grants or revokes permissions to a vault.

Syntax:

storm> vault.set.perm --help


            Set permissions on a vault.

            Examples:

                // Give blackout read permissions to visi's user vault
                vault.set.perm "my-user-vault" blackout --level read

                // Give the contributor role read permissions to visi's user vault
                vault.set.perm "my-user-vault" --role contributor --level read

                // Revoke blackout's permissions from visi's user vault
                vault.set.perm "my-user-vault" blackout --revoke

                // Give visi read permissions to the contributor role vault. (Assume
                // visi is not a member of the contributor role).
                vault.set.perm "contributor-role-vault" visi read


Usage: vault.set.perm [options] <name>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --user <user>               : The user name or role name to update in the vault.
  --role <role>               : Specified when `user` is a role name.
  --level <level>             : The permission level to grant.
  --revoke                    : Specify this flag when revoking an existing permission.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The vault name or iden to set permissions on.

vault.set.secrets

The vault.set.secrets command sets the specified secret for the vault.

Syntax:

storm> vault.set.secrets --help


            Set vault secret data.

            Examples:

                // Set data to visi's user vault secrets
                vault.set.secrets "visi-user-vault" apikey --value foobar

                // Set data to contributor's role vault secrets
                vault.set.secrets "contributor-role-vault" apikey --value barbaz

                // Remove apikey from a global vault secrets
                vault.set.secrets "some-global-vault" apikey --delete


Usage: vault.set.secrets [options] <name> <key>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --value <value>             : The secret value to store in the vault.
  --delete                    : Specify this flag to remove the secret from the vault.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The vault name or iden.
  <key>                       : The key for the secret value.

vault.del

The vault.del command deletes a vault.

Syntax:

storm> vault.del --help


            Delete a vault.

            Examples:

                // Delete visi's user vault
                vault.del "visi-user-vault"

                // Delete contributor's role vault
                vault.del "contributor-role-vault"


Usage: vault.del [options] <name>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <name>                      : The vault name or iden.

version

The version command displays the current version of Synapse and associated metadata.

Syntax:

storm> version --help

Show version metadata relating to Synapse.

Usage: version [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

view

Storm includes view.* commands that allow you to work with views (see View).

Help for individual view.* commands can be displayed using:

<command> --help

view.add

The view.add command adds a view to the Cortex.

Syntax:

storm> view.add --help

Add a view to the cortex.

Usage: view.add [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --name <name>               : The name of the new view. (default: None)
  --worldreadable <worldreadable>: Grant read access to the `all` role. (default: False)
  --layers [<layers> ...]     : Layers for the view. (default: [])

view.fork

The view.fork command forks an existing view from the Cortex. Forking a view creates a new view with a new writeable layer on top of the set of layers from the previous (forked) view.

Syntax:

storm> view.fork --help

Fork a view in the cortex.

Usage: view.fork [options] <iden>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --name <name>               : Name for the newly forked view. (default: None)

Arguments:

  <iden>                      : Iden of the view to fork.

view.set

The view.set command sets a property on the specified view.

Syntax:

storm> view.set --help

Set a view option.

Usage: view.set [options] <iden> <name> <valu>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <iden>                      : Iden of the view to modify.
  <name>                      : The name of the view property to set.
  <valu>                      : The value to set the view property to.

view.get

The view.get command retrieves an existing view from the Cortex.

Syntax:

storm> view.get --help

Get a view from the cortex.

Usage: view.get [options] <iden>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  [iden]                      : Iden of the view to get. If no iden is provided, the main view will be returned.

view.list

The view.list command lists the views in the Cortex.

Syntax:

storm> view.list --help

List the views in the cortex.

Usage: view.list [options]

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

view.exec

The view.exec command executes a Storm query in the specified view.

Behavior and Limitations

The view.exec command creates its own execution environment (sub-runtime) to execute a Storm query in a different view. This results in a firm separation boundary between the source view and the destination view where nodes do not pass in or out across the view.exec boundary. Pipelines, events, messages, etc will NOT pass from the destination view to the source view or vice-versa. This includes $lib.print(...), $lib.warn(...), and other functions that may print to the CLI.

Variables declared before the view.exec are accessible in the destination view (including assignment). The interactive help example demonstrates this behavior:

// Move some tagged nodes to another view
inet:fqdn#foo.bar $fqdn=$node.value() | view.exec 95d5f31f0fb414d2b00069d3b1ee64c6 { [ inet:fqdn=$fqdn ] }

Here we have inet:fqdn nodes with the tag #foo.bar being lifted and their value (not the node) is saved into the $fqdn variable. This variable is later accessible in the view.exec sub-query and used to create an inet:fqdn node in the destination view. If more than one inet:fqdn node with the tag #foo.bar exists, the view.exec command would be executed once for each node in the pipeline as expected. Again, the actual nodes will not be accessible in the view.exec query. Also note the sub-query executed in the view.exec may assign a different value back to $fqdn to be accessed by the source view (that doesn’t happen in this example though).

Inline functions are bound to the scope they are declared in. For view.exec, this means that a function declared outside the view.exec command will still run in the original scope/view, not the view specified to view.exec.

Syntax:

storm> view.exec --help


    Execute a storm query in a different view.

    NOTE: Variables are passed through but nodes are not. The behavior of this command may be
    non-intuitive in relation to the way storm normally operates. For further information on
    behavior and limitations when using `view.exec`, reference the `view.exec` section of the
    Synapse User Guide: https://v.vtx.lk/view-exec.

    Examples:

        // Move some tagged nodes to another view
        inet:fqdn#foo.bar $fqdn=$node.value() | view.exec 95d5f31f0fb414d2b00069d3b1ee64c6 { [ inet:fqdn=$fqdn ] }


Usage: view.exec [options] <view> <storm>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <view>                      : The GUID of the view in which the query will execute.
  <storm>                     : The storm query to execute on the view.

view.merge

The view.merge command merges all data from a forked view into its parent view.

Contrast with merge which can merge a subset of nodes.

Syntax:

storm> view.merge --help

Merge a forked view into its parent view.

Usage: view.merge [options] <iden>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --delete                    : Once the merge is complete, delete the layer and view.

Arguments:

  <iden>                      : Iden of the view to merge.

view.del

The view.del command permanently deletes a view from the Cortex.

Syntax:

storm> view.del --help

Delete a view from the cortex.

Usage: view.del [options] <iden>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.

Arguments:

  <iden>                      : Iden of the view to delete.

wget

The wget command retrieves content from one or more specified URLs. The command creates and yields inet:urlfile nodes and the retrieved content (file:bytes) is stored in the Axon.

Syntax:

storm> wget --help

Retrieve bytes from a URL and store them in the axon. Yields inet:urlfile nodes.

Examples:

    # Specify custom headers and parameters
    inet:url=https://vertex.link/foo.bar.txt | wget --headers ({"User-Agent": "Foo/Bar"}) --params ({"clientid": "42"})

    # Download multiple URL targets without inbound nodes
    wget https://vertex.link https://vtx.lk


Usage: wget [options] <urls>

Options:

  --help                      : Display the command usage.
  --no-ssl-verify             : Ignore SSL certificate validation errors.
  --timeout <timeout>         : Configure the timeout for the download operation. (default: 300)
  --params <params>           : Provide a dict containing url parameters. (default: None)
  --headers <headers>         : Provide a Storm dict containing custom request headers. (default:
{                                 'Accept': '*/*',
                                  'Accept-Encoding': 'gzip, deflate',
                                  'Accept-Language': 'en-US,en;q=0.9',
                                  'User-Agent': 'Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64) '
                                                'AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) '
                                                'Chrome/92.0.4515.131 Safari/537.36'})
  --no-headers                : Do NOT use any default headers.

Arguments:

  [<urls> ...]                : URLs to download.